Courses

The aim of this course is to help you further develop as a writer within the English speaking academic community by raising awareness of, practicing, and reflecting upon the conventions of written texts. In addition to addressing issues related to academic writing, the course will also focus on the other skills you...
Instructor: Thomas Rooney
Credits: 1.5
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Instructor: Hanoch Ben-Yami
Credits: 2.0
The course gives an overview of key issues of ancient philosophy from the Presocratics to the Hellenistic Age. The course does not require or build on any specific previous knowledge of ancient philosophy. We will read and discuss a selection of texts from different authors and periods, focussing on their...
Instructor: István Bodnár
Credits: 2.0
Mind and matter don’t seem to fit in the same world; this is the essence of the mind-body problem. Space-filling solid stuff doesn’t seem to belong with invisible inner-experiencing. The neural processing of the brain is best known through third-person scientific investigation; whilst the subjective first-person...
Instructor: Philip Goff
Credits: 2.0
The course addresses both low-profile but very important strands in continental philosophy, like mainstream phenomenology and early hermeneutics, and the high-profile tradition marked by a sharp contrast with analytic approaches. Some of the main ideas in the later tradition to be discussed are: the idea that the very...
Instructor: Nenad Miscevic
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: David Weberman
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: tba
Credits: 0.5
The department arranges for about ten colloquia per semester, usually on Tuesdays, in which visiting or CEU faculty give talks on diverse topics followed by discussion with the audience. Students are required to attend at least seven of these meetings and are encouraged to participate in the discussion. No further...
Instructor: various
Credits: 1.0
In the reading seminar, students read and discuss recent work in a variety of philosophical areas. This is intended to help them keep abreast of recent developments and also widen and deepen their acquaintance withá a variety of philosophical subjects. The seminar meets every second week and is coordinated by a 2nd or...
Instructor: various
Credits: 1.0
The aim of the Work-in-progress Seminar is to provide a forum for doctoral candidates to acquire professional skills and receive continuous feedback on their work. The seminars consist of discussions of recent literature in the area of the candidates' research and presentations of the candidates' work in progress.
Instructor: Ferenc Huoranszki
Credits: 2.0
This course provides opportunity for philosophy doctoral students to discuss their research together on a regular weekly basis.
Instructor: Ferenc Huoranszki
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Katalin Farkas
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Tim Crane
Credits: 2.0
We will look at some of the major arguments for the existence of God, in both their historical forms, and in the more modern versions. This will include especially the ontological argument, the first cause argument, and the argument from design. Then we will move on to consider some of the properties traditionally...
Instructor: Howard Robinson
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Philip Goff
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: István Bodnár
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Simon Rippon
Credits: 2.0
There is a prima facie duty not kill people. But, in certain circumstances it seems permissible to do so. The course explores under which conditions killing is morally acceptable and the kinds of constraints that we face when killing someone. We will address some of the following questions: do we have to save the...
Instructor: Andres Moles
Credits: 4.0
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Instructor: Katalin Farkas
Credits: 4.0
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Instructor: TBA
Credits: 2.0
MA students are required to enroll in thesis seminar in the Winter Term prior to their defense. Students must give presentations of their work and attend the presentations of others.
Instructor: Simon Rippon
Credits: 2.0
The course offers a general introduction into some of the major problems of contemporary analytic metaphysics. Metaphysics is a study of the most general categories in order to answer the questions what is real and what are the ultimate constituents of reality. In the course we’ll be addressing the following problems...
Instructor: Ferenc Huoranszki
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Ferenc Huoranszki
Credits: 4.0
We shall study several central topics in contemporary philosophy of language. Each of these topics is central not only in focusing much discussion but also in influencing the discussion of other philosophical issues. Due to the variety of topics, none will be exhaustively discussed in the course, but the hope is that...
Instructor: Hanoch Ben-Yami
Credits: 2.0
The way science works raises deep and pressing philosophical questions. Is there a way to demarcate science from non-science? How is scientific knowledge made reliable? Is it giving us access to reality or is it merely a tool for successful prediction? The so-called “analytic” project (following Barker...
Instructor: Maria Kronfeldner
Credits: 2.0
This course is a survey of 17th and 18th-century philosophy meant to fulfill a core requirement in the 2-year MA program. The main aim of the course is to acquire knowledge of the central issues and arguments of the early modern period. Topics will include knowledge and skepticism, the nature of substance, the...
Instructor: Mike Griffin
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Tim Crane, Howard Robinson
Credits: 4.0
The aim of this short course is to help you to plan and write your MA thesis.
Instructor: Thomas Rooney
Credits: 0.5
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Instructor: Hanoch Ben-Yami
Credits: 2.0