Courses

The aim of this course is to help you further develop as a writer within the English speaking academic community by raising awareness of, practicing, and reflecting upon the conventions of written texts. In addition to addressing issues related to academic writing, the course will also focus on the other skills you...
Instructor: Thomas Rooney
Credits: 1.5
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Instructor: Katalin Farkas
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: István Bodnár
Credits: 2.0
The course gives an overview of key issues of ancient philosophy from the Presocratics to the Hellenistic Age. The course does not require or build on any specific previous knowledge of ancient philosophy. We will read and discuss a selection of texts from different authors and periods, focussing on their...
Instructor: István Bodnár
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Katalin Farkas
Credits: 4.0
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Instructor: Ferenc Huoranszki
Credits: 2.0
This course provides a foundation and an entry point into current debates in metaethics for students of philosophy. We will investigate questions such as: Do moral thoughts and moral sentences represent properties that exist in reality? If so, are these properties "natural" or sui generis? How can different theories...
Instructor: Simon Rippon
Credits: 4.0
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Instructor: David Weberman
Credits: 2.0
The department arranges for about ten colloquia per semester, usually on Tuesdays, in which visiting or CEU faculty give talks on diverse topics followed by discussion with the audience. Students are required to attend at least seven of these meetings and are encouraged to participate in the discussion. No further...
Instructor: various
Credits: 2.0
In the reading seminar, students read and discuss recent work in a variety of philosophical areas. This is intended to help them keep abreast of recent developments and also widen and deepen their acquaintance withá a variety of philosophical subjects. The seminar meets every second week and is coordinated by a 2nd or...
Instructor: various
Credits: 2.0
The aim of the Work-in-progress Seminar is to provide a forum for doctoral candidates to acquire professional skills and receive continuous feedback on their work. The seminars consist of discussions of recent literature in the area of the candidates' research and presentations of the candidates' work in progress.
Instructor: Tim Crane, Howard Robinson
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Mike Griffin
Credits: 2.0
The course offers an introduction into some classic problems of epistemology which form the subject of lively discussion also in contemporary philosophy. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the central concepts of contemporary epistemological research, to enable them to discern the essential features...
Instructor: Katalin Farkas
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Maria Kronfeldner
Credits: 4.0
We will look at some of the major arguments for the existence of God, in both their historical forms, and in the more modern versions. This will include especially the ontological argument, the first cause argument, and the argument from design. Then we will move on to consider some of the properties traditionally...
Instructor: Howard Robinson
Credits: 2.0
The primary aim of this course is an in-depth discussion of Book II of Aristotle’s De anima, a key text of the philosophy of mind in ancient philosophy. For the reading of the De anima some preliminary knowledge of Greek is required, on the basis of which we will read and translate the text, and give an in depth...
Instructor: István Bodnár
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: David Weberman
Credits: 4.0
The course offers an introduction to some central issues in the philosophy of law. These include questions concerning the nature and content of the law, the relationship between law and morality, the question of whether there is an obligation to obey the law, and the question of what justifies punishment. We will also...
Instructor: Katalin Farkas
Credits: 2.0
The course offers a broad introduction to the main topics in the field of formal logic. It aims to familiarize the participants with its theoretical framework and terminology, while placing emphasis on their practical applications, especially as used within philosophy.
Instructor: Mike Griffin
Credits: 2.0
MA students are required to enroll in thesis seminar in the Winter Term prior to their defense. Students must give presentations of their work and attend the presentations of others.
Instructor: Simon Rippon
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Tim Crane
Credits: 2.0
The course offers a general introduction into some of the major problems of contemporary analytic metaphysics. Metaphysics is a study of the most general categories in order to answer the questions what is real and what are the ultimate constituents of reality. In the course we’ll be addressing the following problems...
Instructor: Ferenc Huoranszki
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Tim Crane
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Nenad Miscevic
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Mike Griffin
Credits: 4.0
We will consider the properties attributed to God in the Western philosophical tradition. We will examine both historical and contemporary attempts to formulate doctrines of divine omniscience, omnipotence and absolute goodness, as well as eternality, simplicity, immutability and necessary existence. We will...
Instructor: Mike Griffin
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Janos Kis
Credits: 4.0
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Instructor: Nenad Miscevic
Credits: 2.0

War

War involves widespread killing and maiming. For this reason it is of utmost importance to understand the morality that governs the conduct for and in war. Besides its practical importance war also raises many philosophical interesting issues. In this course we will explore some prominent aspects of war theory. We...
Instructor: Andres Moles
Credits: 2.0