Courses

The aim of this course is to help you further develop as a writer within the English speaking academic community by raising awareness of, practicing, and reflecting upon the conventions of written texts. In addition to addressing issues related to academic writing, the course will also focus on the other skills you...
Instructor: Thomas Rooney
Credits: 1.5
The course is divided into two parts: (i) the truth-valuational approach to logic; (ii) the quantified argument calculus.(i) The standard semantics for Predicate Logic and other formal systems is model-theoretic, using domains and interpretation functions to explain when a sentence is true, and with this theory of...
Instructor: Hanoch Ben-Yami
Credits: 2.0
The course gives an overview of key issues of ancient philosophy from the Presocratics to the Hellenistic Age. The course does not require or build on any specific previous knowledge of ancient philosophy. We will read and discuss a selection of texts from different authors and periods, focussing on their...
Credits: 2.0
This is an advanced course in the philosophy of mind, with connections to epistemology. The course presupposes familiarity with basic philosophical concepts in the philosophy of mind and epistemology. It focuses on the nature of belief, and its relationship to knowledge. The topic has a rich history and it's...
Instructor: Katalin Farkas
Credits: 4.0
The course intends to give a more or less systematic introduction to some of the main problems and their treatment in the late antique and medieval philosophy schools. The historical starting point is 176 AD, when Emperor Marcus Aurelius founded four chairs of philosophy in Athens, and the end of the period is set (...
Credits: 4.0
How can cognitive science inform policy-making? Can policy be improved by taking findings of cognitive science into account?            Traditional policy making assumes that citizens are rational agents who always take the best decisions for themselves. Yet, findings in behavioral economics and cognitive psychology...
Instructor: Christophe Heintz
Credits: 2.0
Mind and matter don’t seem to fit in the same world; this is the essence of the mind-body problem. Space-filling solid stuff doesn’t seem to belong with invisible inner-experiencing. The neural processing of the brain is best known through third-person scientific investigation; whilst the subjective first-person...
Instructor: Philip Goff
Credits: 2.0
The course addresses both low-profile but very important strands in continental philosophy, like mainstream phenomenology and early hermeneutics, and the high-profile tradition marked by a sharp contrast with analytic approaches. Some of the main ideas in the later tradition to be discussed are: the idea that the very...
Instructor: Nenad Miscevic
Credits: 2.0
Counter-Enlightenment” is a retrospectively-generated term made famous by Isaiah Berlin to refer to certain strains in 18th and 19th century thought that react against the idea of the enlightenment process as found in 18th century Enlightenment thinkers.  While there is a political dimension to the Counter-...
Instructor: David Weberman
Credits: 2.0
The department arranges for about ten colloquia per semester, usually on Tuesdays, in which visiting or CEU faculty give talks on diverse topics followed by discussion with the audience. Students are required to attend at least seven of these meetings and are encouraged to participate in the discussion. No further...
Instructor: various
Credits: 1.0
In the reading seminar, students read and discuss recent work in a variety of philosophical areas. This is intended to help them keep abreast of recent developments and also widen and deepen their acquaintance withá a variety of philosophical subjects. The seminar meets every second week and is coordinated by a 2nd or...
Instructor: various
Credits: 1.0
The aim of the Work-in-progress Seminar is to provide a forum for doctoral candidates to acquire professional skills and receive continuous feedback on their work. The seminars consist of discussions of recent literature in the area of the candidates' research and presentations of the candidates' work in progress.
Instructor: Tim Crane
Credits: 2.0
The aim of the Work-in-progress Seminar is to provide a forum for doctoral candidates to acquire professional skills and receive continuous feedback on their work. The seminars consist of discussions of recent literature in the area of the candidates' research and presentations of the candidates' work in progress.
Instructor: Ferenc Huoranszki
Credits: 2.0
The main aim of this course is to critically examine some of the major themes in contemporary environmental philosophy. Key objectives are to develop an understanding of some of the major concepts and issues at stake in environmental philosophy, and to help students come to their own informed and reasoned views on the...
Instructor: Alan Watt
Credits: 2.0
The course offers an introduction into some classic problems of epistemology which form the subject of lively discussion also in contemporary philosophy. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the central concepts of contemporary epistemological research, to enable them to discern the essential features...
Credits: 2.0
This course will introduce three main features of moral philosophy: (i) the central themes of metaethics — the study of the metaphysics and epistemology of ethical thought or discourse; (ii) the idea that morality is based on reason and that it is based on sentiment; (iii) the main ethical theories which dominate...
Credits: 2.0
This course will investigate aspects of the philosophy of existence and being which touch on its relationship with the philosophy of language and mind, as well as with metaphysics. We will look at some of the history of the idea of existence in philosophy, and how it relates to the idea of being. We will examine and...
Instructor: Tim Crane
Credits: 4.0
This course provides an important intellectual and practical grounding for your work, first as a teaching assistant, and later as an independent scholar and teacher or other professional in the field. The course runs for 12 weeks from the end of September to mid December and engages you in discussion, collaboration,...
Credits: 3.0
The course deals with a few of the most fundamental problems of contemporary political philosophy, regarding the ground and scope of the authority of the state to make and enforce rules that bind its citizens. Most people would agree that the state indeed has such authority, and that citizens are usually under a moral...
Instructor: Zoltan Miklosi
Credits: 2.0
We will look at some of the major arguments for the existence of God, in both their historical forms, and in the more modern versions. This will include especially the ontological argument, the first cause argument, and the argument from design. Then we will move on to consider some of the properties traditionally...
Instructor: Howard Robinson
Credits: 2.0
Discourse on Western religion is dominated by the dichotomy between theism and atheism. In this course we will explore non-standard conceptions of the divine, with a particular focus on pantheism and panentheism. In the first half of the course we will read a book manuscript I have been working on, in which I explain...
Instructor: Philip Goff
Credits: 2.0
The primary aim of this course is an in-depth discussion of Book II of Aristotle’s De anima, a key text of the philosophy of mind in ancient philosophy. For the reading of the De anima some preliminary knowledge of Greek is required, on the basis of which we will read and translate the text, and give an in depth...
Instructor: István Bodnár
Credits: 2.0
The primary goal of this course is to gain a better understanding of David Hume’s moral theory through careful reading and discussion of his work, with special reference to his Treatise of Human Nature. We will read his sentimentalist moral theory and try to interpret it within two broader contexts: the context of his...
Instructor: Simon Rippon
Credits: 2.0
The study of politics includes not only how the political world operates, but also how it ought to operate. The course focuses on John Rawls’ A Theory of Justice and some of the most important objections it has been presented with in the last thirty years. The course addresses some of these questions: what is a fair...
Instructor: Andres Moles
Credits: 4.0
The course offers an introduction to some central issues in the philosophy of law. These include questions concerning the nature and content of the law, the relationship between law and morality, the question of whether there is an obligation to obey the law, and the question of what justifies punishment. We will also...
Instructor: Katalin Farkas
Credits: 2.0
This course provides a forum for discussion of a selection of topics in applied ethics through mainly contemporary philosophical literature. In examining these topics, we will discuss principles and problems of broader philosophical significance in applied ethics, as these turn out to underlie many disagreements. We...
Instructor: Chrys Margaritidis
Credits: 2.0
There is a prima facie duty not kill people. But, in certain circumstances it seems permissible to do so. The course explores under which conditions killing is morally acceptable and the kinds of constraints that we face when killing someone. We will address some of the following questions: do we have to save the...
Instructor: Andres Moles
Credits: 2.0
The course this year focuses on ancient, late ancient and medieval cosmology. Through a thread of sources, it tackles the approaches taken throughout these periods towards the understanding of the universe. The course gives a general introduction to the ancient, late ancient and medieval notions of science and...
Instructor: Anna Somfai
Credits: 2.0
The first half of the course is more theoretical, examining the libertarian view of justice according to which the role of the state is to protect natural property rights. We will consider questions such as the following:Are there pre-legal property rights, i.e. moral facts about ownership which obtain prior to the...
Instructor: Philip Goff
Credits: 2.0
The course offers a broad introduction to the main topics in the field of formal logic. It aims to familiarize the participants with its theoretical framework and terminology, while placing emphasis on their practical applications, especially as used within philosophy.
Instructor: Edi Pavlovic
Credits: 2.0
MA students are required to enroll in thesis seminar in the Winter Term prior to their defense. Students must give presentations of their work and attend the presentations of others.
Instructor: Simon Rippon
Credits: 2.0
The course offers a general introduction into some of the major problems of contemporary analytic metaphysics. Metaphysics is a study of the most general categories in order to answer the questions what is real and what are the ultimate constituents of reality. In the course we’ll be addressing the following problems...
Instructor: Ferenc Huoranszki
Credits: 2.0
The purpose of this course is to introduce students into some metaphysical issues in the philosophy of causation, with particular focus on the connection between causation on the one hand, and manipulation and agency on the other. The issues to be discussed include the following: whether or not causal concepts are...
Credits: 4.0
The idea of a perspective originally comes from visual experience, but we use it much more widely, both in philosophy and in common speech. But can it be so easily extended and if so, what precise meaning, if any, does it continue to have (after its extension)? We will begin with its most famous deployment in...
Instructor: David Weberman
Credits: 4.0
The purpose of this course is to introduce students into some fundamental problems concerning the knowledge, explanation, and metaphysics of human action. Accordingly, the topics of the course divide into three major groups. First, we shall discuss the issue concerning the explanation of actions: whether reasons...
Instructor: Ferenc Huoranszki
Credits: 4.0
During the past several decades, the emotions have emerged as a topic of major concern in philosophy. While this appears to be a relatively new development, interest in the emotions has a far longer, and more enduring, history, reaching back to the ancient beginnings of philosophical inquiry itself. Given that fact...
Instructor: Curie Virág
Credits: 2.0
We shall study several central topics in contemporary philosophy of language. Each of these topics is central not only in focusing much discussion but also in influencing the discussion of other philosophical issues. Due to the variety of topics, none will be exhaustively discussed in the course, but the hope is that...
Instructor: Hanoch Ben-Yami
Credits: 2.0
The modern part will be divided into three parts, following the usual division of the study of language. First grammar/syntax, its nature and our  knowledge of it (including grammatical intuitions of ordinary native speakers). Second, the area of semantics; we shall choose one famous topic, the semantics  of definite...
Credits: 2.0
The way science works raises deep and pressing philosophical questions. Is there a way to demarcate science from non-science? How is scientific knowledge made reliable? Is it giving us access to reality or is it merely a tool for successful prediction? The so-called “analytic” project (following Barker...
Instructor: Maria Kronfeldner
Credits: 2.0
This seminar is offered by the Center for Teaching and Learning.Podcasting in academia has the potential to be radically open. If done right, podcasting allows students to expand the contours of their learning, not only pushing their teachers to rethink and re-articulate their lessons, but also giving a public voice...
Credits: 1.0
This course is a survey of 17th and 18th-century philosophy meant to fulfill a core requirement in the 2-year MA program. The main aim of the course is to acquire knowledge of the central issues and arguments of the early modern period. Topics will include knowledge and skepticism, the nature of substance, the...
Instructor: Mike Griffin
Credits: 2.0
This is a University-wide Course and it is open to all CEU students.Social justice is a widely engaged concept with varied definitions and ideological assumptions, as well as equally contrasting and diverse practical or empirical implications across disciplines and institutions. It is considered as a political...
Credits: 4.0
This course will investigate some central themes in the metaphysics of the mind: the nature of the self, the self as a substance, the relationship between self and person, the notion of a mental state, a mental process, a mental event, and mental property, and the metaphysical distinctions these involve. The first...
Instructor: Tim Crane, Howard Robinson
Credits: 4.0
The course provides an introduction into current-day philosophically inspired cognitive developmental theory and evolutionary perspectives of the nature of human concepts and their origins. The core reading for the course will be the book by Susan Carey entitled `The Origin of Concepts` (OUP, 2009). The in-depth...
Instructor: György Gergely
Credits: 2.0
The rise of populism throughout the Euro-American world has renewed both popular and academic interest in an age-old challenge to democracy: Why should citizens who are incompetent, ignorant, uneducated, or easy to manipulate, have a right to participate in political decision-making? Contrary to this spirit, at the...
Instructor: Attila Mraz
Credits: 2.0
This course addresses some philosophical topics that are in the focus of interest both in the early modern period and contemporary research. One goal of the course is to explore how assumptions in formulating and answering problems changed in the history of philosophy. For each topic, we will pair readings from the...
Credits: 4.0
The aim of this short course is to help you to plan and write your MA thesis.
Instructor: Thomas Rooney
Credits: 0.5
The course covers some major issues debated in the arts and theological faculties of the universities of the Latin West between the eleventh and the fourteenth centuries. Topics will include an introduction to medieval theories of language, semantics and logic, theory of knowledge and science, major issues in natural...
Instructor: György Geréby
Credits: 2.0
The course will be based on a close reading of parts of the Philosophical Investigations and some other late work by Wittgenstein. I shall start with Wittgenstein's remarks on voluntary action, as this subject is relevant to the work of several students. We shall then continue with his related remarks on intention and...
Instructor: Hanoch Ben-Yami
Credits: 2.0